Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Tesco Westgate In 3D

Westgate Tesco Express from Plans
Updated Friday 12th April. Please see the "Alternative Conservation Report' available here.

The final decision on a Tesco Express in Westgate's Station Road, comes back to the Council's Planning Committee for debate on the evening of 17th April.

This time, no public speaking is allowed but as the councillor representing the objectors, I am allowed a summing-up. So our small band of  dedicated volunteer experts, historians and conservationists, will be working with me on a script to attack the weaknesses in the planning and highways department's arguments with forensic precision.

One of our local residents, Brian Kok, a 'Computer Buddy' at Westgate Library - see comments - has used his professional talents to create a three-dimensional rendering of the Tesco building from its published plans and made it available to everyone by using Google's free 'Sketchup' product that you can download here. This will allow you to view the building in 3D and from all angles.

The data file is quite large and so I have stored it on my cloud storage account on BOX.Com and you can download it here.

So, if you want to see the plans in 3D on your computer, first download the Google Sketchup program and install it and then download and save the Tesco data file to your PC. Double click it and it should then immediately open-up the plans for you to play with in Sketchup.

I have included some screen captures so you can see what it looks like and judge for yourself, whether the building with its high quality PVC materials, is indeed 'Sympathetic; to Westgate's Station Road and Conservation Area.

It's more than likely that the council chamber will be packed to capacity once again at 7pm on 17th April, so please arrive early if you wish to attend.

34 comments:

Brian said...

Hello,

This model was for my own personal use, to compare it's scale.

I'd like to point out the model is not finished, as the rear view on the planning application is incomplete.

There is around 6 metres missing on the latest drawing. This can be seen on the top left of the rear view on the model(The big white square).

The models scale is based upon the measurement specified for the pedestrian crossing build outs of 5.5 metres. This can be checked using the tape measure tool in Google Sketchup.

If you need any help, I am one of three Computer Buddies available at the Westgate Library.

Anonymous said...

Looking good! When does it open?

Anonymous said...

Does anyone know how many jobs this new Tesco will create?

Anonymous said...

Does anyone know what is bring built on the site opposite the park on Ethelbert Square? Building work began yesterday and is continuing today. Anything is better than nothing on that site!
Thank you

Anonymous said...

I don't know 12:44, but apparently the Westbrook store (which I think is smaller) created 24 jobs, albeit some of them just part time. Add the knock-on effect of other nearby businesses profiting or opening (both a cafe & takeaway a few doors away; certainly NO stores in Wesbrook have closed since Tesco opened), then the total figure must be well over 30!

Anonymous said...

30 is around the number according to other stores that have
Opened recently. All materials to conservation approval which will be a novalty rather than the PVC that has gone into other first floor units in station road.
Our councillors have turned a blind eye to this though.
Cllr Moores has one of the oldest houses in Westgate yet has inserted ugly PVC windows! And then he claims to
Be in total support of conservation. Interesting!

Simon Moores said...

Thanks Chris. Anything else? Perhaps you don't approve of our garden either?

Simon Moores said...

In fact, if I had wanted to make a fast buck out of the oldest property in Westgate, then I would have followed through on the offer to knock it down and use the land for a new surgery!

Anonymous said...

Isn't Questeds by far the oldest property in
Westgate? Sorry but I don't think you can claim that!
And it hasn't got PVC windows.

Simon Moores said...

1791....my house was built.

Simon Moores said...

Meanwhile.. Leaving aside the attentions of my own stalker who confuses me with someone who gives a damn what he thinks of my property, we have rather more important matters to concern ourselves with here in Westgate.

Unless of course he wishes to share his address and then we can all go and pass comment on the state and style of his house.

Anonymous said...

Only 150 years newer than Questeds then!
We all know that Edwards shop front has had works carried out in last 18 months! Is cheap sheet ply material conservation approved?
What about the Plastic that Councillors have turned a blind eye to in Station Road, why is this acceptable?
Why the double standards!

Simon Moores said...

Loud yawn....

Simon Moores said...


Westgate on Sea is a unique town in terms of its built environment. One of the most intact of the former private estate towns in the country, the historic evolution of Westgate can still be clearly read in its public spaces and buildings.

Questeds, Westgate-on-Sea’s oldest building, represents the town’s earliest beginnings as open farmland, stretching to the sea. The former farmhouse is complemented by its setting, still sited within a substantial portion of land which evokes the character of Westgate before the town was developed. The grounds of Quested, together with those of the adjacent property, Ecclestone, are an important green space in the centre of a densely developed area. The former Coastguards Station, situated on the eastern boundary of the town, is also a reminder of the earliest stages of the town’s history.

The presence of the original builders yard of Westgate, Lockwood’s Yard, and the artisan houses of Chester and Quex Road, built to accommodate the various tradesmen employed during the building of the town, is a unique feature of Westgate, preserved in almost entirely original condition.

Anonymous said...

Well done for finally acknowledging that, an excerpt I believe from TDC 2006 conservation review!
Edwards and sheet ply refurb?
Station road and plastic windows?

Anonymous said...

805 I think your anorak strings are a bit tight mate.

Anonymous said...

805 I think that's the point. Because the proposed Tesco is a dominant new building outside the existing parades (Station Road/St Mildreds), it would suck the life out of them, and thereby the funds to keep them in good conserved nick. Odd, out-of-keeping dressing such as wrong (but still expensive)windows in the past isn't reason to abandon the Victorian parades.
(Ref pvc, I think it is the shape of the curved canopies that works. Does proposed Tesco really include corrugated iron? On the sun-less side?)
It seems bizarre when retail is contracting to add a major off-centre new block and expect anything much else to survive. Westbrook you have to walk to, so good for nearby shops. Westgate is drive-in-off. Tesco say it will be walked to, but people are seeing it as a (short term) alternative to Westwood - as a quick drive-and-freepark, say from Margate or Birchington. 'Course free parking is already pretty saturated, incl by residents, so Westgate will need parking charges too.

Anonymous said...

I do not know your Anon contributor at 8:05, most recently, but I bet last year he was chained to a tree in Pieremont Park, thinks that Michael Child is an expert on planning, attends meetings in the Red Hall and counts Louise amongst his friends.

Anonymous said...

10:32, people were saying the same thing a year ago when the Westbrook Tesco opened, but instead of "sucking the life" out of nearby shops they've all prospered, as well as new shops opening. In other words it has helped regenerate the area, as well as supply much needed local employment.

As for petitions, many people are afraid to say no. I was asked to sign a petition in Spar in Westbrook against Tesco around 18 months ago, but told them politely but honestly that I supported it. I effectively got banned from the store. I'm sure a secret ballot would tell a very different story on how local people feel.

Anonymous said...

It is a much bigger issue than whether Tesco will "suck the life out of nearby shops" and is not comparable with Westbrook. The character of the town, which Simon has talked about earlier, will be lost forever and for what? We just don't need another Tesco in Thanet.
Joni Mitchell had it right - "you don't know what you have got til its gone".

Anonymous said...

I was trying to point out Westbrook is different because it doesnt offer easy parking. It is meant as a proper convenience store for locals, and is likely to help local shops. Westgate is a much more dominant affair, with the attraction of easy (free) drive-in-drive-off (whether or not it is easy). It draws people away from the Victorian parades, and existing grocery retailers. What will replace them? It is too dangerous to add a new building to existing units at a time when retail is failing. (I like Tesco, but the idea of convenience stores is to spread them out, not put them in one place, like putting all the retail at Westwood)

Anonymous said...

...So, say it goes ahead - Exploring long term, (beyond this year's excitement over a Tesco brand), convenience outlets such as Tesco will be everywhere. The major impact of this ugly 7-shop-long full-frontal Tesco will have damaged Westgate's retail equilibrium (as well as its intact heritage). The Victorian parades which now provide full convenience+ service will struggle to find an alternative market, will be empty, or in poor repair. What would replace them? Other places are getting the odd pawn shop, betting shop. But Westgate between-railway-and-sea, hasn’t exactly a huge catchment area. It's not going to get 100s of new homes. People can't come from the north. It hasn't dependable visitors (limited by season, tide, weather, now fuel) to sustain more than the odd gift/antique shop. So once convenience stores are everywhere, it is left, having gamely sacrificed its heritage to the cause, with an extra building that, like the other parade units, will not be suitable for conversion to residential.
If it holds its shape, it can go on offering the kind of timeless shopping experience and Victorian world that will please visitors in the future, as it did Betjeman in the past.

Anonymous said...

The other shops won't go out of business as over two thirds of Westgate are against it & will continue supporting the other shops!

Anonymous said...

The neighborhood has to generate enough trade to keep both the Tesco and the existing parades going - and that's just not possible, especially as supermarkets will turn up in time south of the railway. People aren't (necessarily)anti Tesco, just anti-Tesco there!
Am I right that it's bigger than the Co-op? The Co-op has 192.66m2 floor sales of 361m2 total. This says on the form 268m2, but in the blurb 268m2 retail+79m2ground floor backroom+138m2 first floor,= total of 485m2? Is that right? It's very invasive. It's basically a whole new Tesco Parade. And its in your face,rather than hidden away. You can hardly see the Co-op and other shops tucked away behind their deep canopies. Has anyone ever seen a corrugated metal canopy like Tesco suggest to eyebrow their windows? I like the way the blurb says its footprint is larger than nearby shops, but smaller than the garden centre!

Anonymous said...

Isn't the "free market" what Conservatives are supposed to believe in and support? What grounds are there, therefore, for opposing the new Tesco other than political opportunism, ie siding with local opponents being more likely to win votes?

And surely, if the majority of people locally are against Tesco, the latter will assess likely footfall and cancel their plans? Failing that, if the protestors are right, few will use the store if it opens and will continue to use the existing shops? No problem then.

Simon Moores said...

2:50 - Before you jump to all the wrong conclusions, try reading the objections first. It has absolutely nothing to do with politics or conservatism and instead surrounds planning law, the local plan for the area and well-documented conservation concerns.

Anonymous said...

Did you not refuse to support planning permission for offices on this site in favour of more retail shops, Cllr. Moores? Thus attracting the attention of the giant Tesco chain. How can you set yourself up as 'champion' of the small local shops when you paved the way for Tesco?

Simon Moores said...

5.33 Let's get something clear for 5.33 who is clearly struggling to understand even the most simple arguments.

1) The original grant of planning permission was a compromise in favour of stimulating several small shops at the start of the recession that would match in appearance, the look and feel of the street. With two other local councillors in support at the time, I recall my room for maneuver was somewhat limited.

2) Whether I'm Champion or not is quite irrelevant. I was asked by residents and traders to represent them and their concerns and challenge the application. This I am discharging to the best of my ability.

I hope this is now much clearer for you!

Anonymous said...

Looking at the previous application Simon, I see four shops not three.
They have weatherboard and painted differently in bright colours.
Hardly in keeping, wouldn't you agree?
Tesco has a least tried to deal with conservation issues.
Why didn't you support the office scheme as your other CllrsWe're willing to do?
If your still stating this app needs to be sequentially tested
Then I believe your wrong!
The day you approved the retail scheme the need was justified.

Simon Moores said...

I did not approve anything! That was for the planning committee. Offices could have become residential units. There was no local objection to retail units.

End of rather tedious and pointless conversation I think!

Anonymous said...

Don!t you dare patronise me. You were vehement in your argument for retail development on that site. You stated that you would only support planning for retail development. You paved the way for the proposed Tesco outlet. Can anybody trust you to represent them to the BEST of your ability? Is this Now CLEAR to you?
5.33pm

Simon Moores said...

I'm afraid that at times I have little patience for anonymous characters like you 9.37 obsessive, aggressive and factually inaccurate at the same time.

I'm afraid your efforts to rewrite history are quite incorrect and so I recommend a cup of tea and a new hobby which doesn't demand so much of you.

Simon Moores said...

That is what I call "obsessive"!!!

It's very early on a Sunday morning.. I'm off to work and yet the previous commentator is back already, no doubt waiting-up all night for me to reply.

Sorry to disappoint you but I'm not going to accept further comment on this as well as the suggestion that I have re-written my weblog to prove him wrong!

"Get a life" is the expression that spring immediately to mind!

Hadrian said...

An obsessive, aggressive person who is really annoyed that you're supporting the peoples opposition to Tesco, who knows all about the planning history, the other councillors views, lots of other little details and is not too smart.
2 Questions then
Why does it mean so much to them?
Why are they taking a planning matter so personally?

Who can the anonymous poster possibly be?