Sunday, February 05, 2012

Big Snow Small Town

The small town of Westgate is near impassable in parts this morning and I've been out to get supplies from a busy Somerfield helping push one car out of a small bank of snow on the way.

Quite how I'm going to get my rubbish wheelie bins up the long garden path tonight for tomorrow's collection, I don't quite know yet and I see there's a forecast of more snow on the way this evening.

The roads are so bad and as yet, ungritted that I don't recommend that anyone ventures out without at least four-wheel-drive. Having helped one car struggle up to the top of Westgate Bay Avenue on the way to the village, I can only imagine how bad the side-roads must be.



18 comments:

Peter Checksfield said...

Why are the roads ungritted? The snow has been forecast for days now, so it hardly caught them by surprise.

James Maskell said...

The roads round Cecil Square look like they were gritted days ago, when the snow was falling much further North East. Perhaps they jumped the gun a bit?

Good to see the Loop was working this morning. Not so good to only find that out once I had walked through the snow to work for an hour assuming it wasnt!

Peter Checksfield said...

Last year all the pavements (as well as the roads) were gritted at Westwood Cross, but not in Margate High Street or outside the shops in Westbrook. So for people with cars it was actually safer for them to drive 3 miles away than shop locally. Does anyone know what the situation is this year?

1 o'clock Rob said...

I've seen plenty of gritter out and about, on Saturday the amount of salt on the main roads was clearly visible on both the road and car tires.

It doesn't matter how much you grit roads if you get the deluge of snow that we got in a 6 hour period, the only thing that can deal with that is ploughs and they are way to expensive given the frequency that we get snow on that level.

Side roads and pavements will always be a problem as they are in cold countries, unless you have a reserve force of people ready to deploy with snow shovels and large amounts of grit, grit which is better served on roads.

James Maskell said...

Hmmm, a two hour delay to collections and street cleaning tomorrow:

http://www.thanet.gov.uk/news/latest_press_releases/waste_collections_late_start.aspx

Peter Checksfield said...

"Grit that is better served on roads"? Tell that to the elderly who can't walk to shops to do their shopping or risk breaking a hip if they do.

1 o'clock Rob said...

Unless you CLEAR the pavement of snow Peter adding grit does nothing more than turn it into a slick surface that is MORE dangerous than leaving it covered in snow.

Peter Checksfield said...

Presumably people were CLEARING the snow off the pavements at Westwood Cross last year (as well as gritting them) to make them LESS dangerous...

1 o'clock Rob said...

Back in the day, when my folks owned a shop on Northdown road we cleared the pavement outside our shop and also gritted it, in fact quite a few did as it made sense to keep our customers happy... no doubt something not lost on the Management at Westwood Cross, hence why they keep it clear.

Anonymous said...

And who do suggest clears the snow from outside the many closed shops in Margate?

Tom Clarke said...

Snow is an exception in this part of the country only hitting us, if at all, for a few days in some winters. Do people really believe that the money exists to keep on standby a huge army of people with shovels and sacks of grit in readiness.

As for Peter's comment about old people getting to shops. I am old, have a very dodgy hip so what do I do. Prepare so I always have some basic provisions in the pantry to keep me going through such spells. Simples!! And I am not even a meerkat.

Peter Checksfield said...

They should get the unemployed to do it. The fresh air & exercise would do them good.

Anonymous said...

I agree Peter, though it will never happen due to health and safety or human rights. Instead the unemployed are forced to work in Tesco or Poundland for free.

1 o'clock Rob said...

So... lets get this clear shall we. You would force the unemployed, many of whom are unemployed through no fault of their own, to clear the pavements of snow and ice. Would you be "paying" them at minimum wage levels? or would the "payment" be based on the houly rate of say a roadsweeper? Who would be covering the insurance costs of these "ice/snow slaves"? Who would be paying for the travel to and from the ice/snow? Who would be paying for the extra equipment needed? Who would be paying for the clothing/boots etc?

I see Peter and the anon are living in cloud cuckoo land.

Don't worry Peter though, the fact that we will soon be awash with new Tescos and Sainsburys that you are so in favour of means that the old and infirm won't have to dice with death/broken hips for too much longer.

Peter Checksfield said...

Well I'm unemployed of no fault of my own, & I'd certainly be up for it. Nothing unreasonable, just a hour or so a day (give me a spade & tell me where to turn up & I'll be there!). Much better than stacking shelves in a supermarket for nothing.

1 o'clock Rob said...

I think you'd put that down to "sense of community", "civic duty"... one wonders then given that you're "up for it" why you weren't out on the streets yesterday when the need was greatest? Or where you but in disguise?

See you didn't answer the burning financial questions, which part of the ever decreasing social network shall we close down to pay for all the tools that we need to give you? Pay for the insurance that would have to be provided, boots, hats, gloves, hi-vis etc?

You can steamroller over those with your gung ho "I'm up for it jack" posts but they still need an answer... and no unemployed person is going to officially lift a finger before they are.

Peter Checksfield said...

You have no idea what I did or didn't do yesterday (or today), but I think you're missing my whole point. This country is tied down with regulations such as insurance, "proper" working clothes etc, so that's why it won't happen.

I was shocked earlier today when someone told me her kid's school was sent home last week because the class dipped below 16c. Personally I aim to heat my flat to 10c in winter, 12c at a maximum, & instead rely on more clothing. People today have it too easy.

SteveP said...

Why do you need to have snow ploughs at all ?
After visiting New York last year it was great to see how they deal with the snow issue, and boy oh boy do they get snow!
In the 5 days we were there they had over 3 feet of the stuff to deal with, but no roads were closed, no busses cancelled or trains stopped.
Instead of the great lumbering ploughs that the brits use, they have an excellent alternative.... ALL of their council vehicles have the ability to have a snow plough attatchment bolted onto the front, this means that they have 100's of smaller vehicles all running around keeping the city moving.
The same goes for their trains, they bolt on a plough at the front and off they go.
No one moaning, no one expecting it to be done by everyone else..... the brits are a koke, the smallest amount of snow and its chaos.
So take a leaf out of the book from the USA, utilise what you have to its best possible extent.