Monday, August 01, 2011

On the Beach

It's officially summer. Why, because I finally managed to find the time to take my kayak out at high-tide today, at least two months later than usual.

The beach was packed this afternoon and contrary to the somewhat unhelpful rumours that I'm hearing of migrating 'killer' French seaweed invading our coast, everyone I saw today appeared to be alive and well, with a number enjoying ice creams too. Unlike the Brittany coast of France, we don't have wild boar roaming our sands, eating the seaweed either but should anyone spot any of the same, munching their way along the shoreline and stirring-up the weed with their short tusks, do please let me know through the usual channels.

Some readers may have noticed the change in wind direction today and with it, the seaweed being pushed out with the tide. Whether it will return I can't say but as I wrote in the previous entry, there's a great deal of effort being made to find ways of disposing of the hundreds of tons that comes our way each summer.

On Friday, Dr Alasdair Bruce and I asked both our local MPs if they could represent our personal concerns to English Nature over our chalk reef being visited by gangs of migrant cockle pickers on a regular basis. This is now visibly an organised trade and I understand it's having a potentially negative impact on the local marine environment as week on week, they collect, if that's the right word, mussels, cockles, oysters, you name it. There are regulations that govern this type of activity but generally fall outside the remit of the local council and no longer reflect what's happening in the Britain of 2011. I'm sure the same is true in seaside towns across the country.

Another BBC Newsroom South-east interview in the morning. Local news must be in short supply for them to be travelling out this far from home twice in under a week.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

TV recently reported on farmers growing grass to feed an 'anaerobic digester' to generate electricity. Any idea if the method could work with seaweed and what investment would be needed? Could be cheaper than wind farms?

DrM. said...

It could and it's an idea which has been much discussed as a potential solution but the cost is such that this would be a central government or county investment/project not one for a cash-strapped local council.

Anonymous said...

What's with the unshaven look (BBC interview), or have you ran out of razors Simon?

DrM. said...

I'm auditioning for the next Pirates of the Caribbean movie!

Anonymous said...

Very good interview today on the news regarding the street signs and TDC removing them. One point though, have you only one tie ? The same one you wore for the seaweed story !

DrM. said...

Last in first out I suppose, i hadn't noticed. More of a soundbite than an interview which is SOP for the BBC

Readit said...

Some years ago I remember a full size submarine made of discarded tyres won the Turner Prize. If we call a seaweed digester "ART" it can fill up the wide open spaces.

Anonymous said...

Hi Simon,could not the small dredger that is employed at Ramsgate be beached on a nice calm day close to the problem weed area the bulldozers could push the weed to the vessel and the hydraulic crane could load it then on floating again take it far out in the channel to dump it,problem solved.
Stargazer.

DrM. said...

It's a good idea and is in the pot among others already suggested. Many thanks